MYTHS YOU DON’T KNOW ABOUT HAY FEVER -

MYTHS YOU DON’T KNOW ABOUT HAY FEVER

Hay fever is a common allergic condition that affects up to one in five people at some point in their life. People will experience hay fever symptoms if they have an allergic reaction to pollen. Meanwhile, pollen is a fine powder released by plants as part of their reproductive cycle. It contains proteins that can cause the nose, eyes, throat and sinuses to become swollen, irritated and inflamed.

Many are said to have been afflicted by the hay fever but how does it came about? Back in the 19 century, it was assumed that freshly cut hay was causing the problem, hence the name hay fever or also known as summer catarrh. Below are some myths that people take to heart;

ITS ORIGIN

The sole connection of hay fever with pollen was made in the year 1859 by the then British scientist called Charles Backley, who is said to have sneezed when he sniffed a pleasingly sweet bluegrass.

DISAPPEARANCE WITH AGE

Typically, people might assume that hay fever starts when one is a child and gradually wears off as one gets older. The very good news is that half of the people do find their symptoms ease a bit with age. A Swedish study found that it was mostly likely to disappear when people were in their 50s.

THAT IT DEPENDS ON THE AMOUNT OF RAIN

Some hay fever sufferers pray for the rain in the hope that the damp condition will stop pollen from spreading through the air and into their eyes and noses. Though light to moderate rainfall does help but heavy rain can have the opposite effect.

THAT HAY FEVER IS WORSE DURING THE DAY

If you suffer from hay fever, the standard advice is to stay indoors during the day when the pollen levels are thought to be higher, waiting until the evening when it is believed to be at the lowest level. But unfortunately, it’s not quite simple as it all depends on the kind pollen that is affecting the very person.

THAT HAY FEVER IS REDUCED BY TAKING HONEY

A spoonful of honey has long been recommended by some individual, but the very question here is does it actually reduce hay fever? Very little research has been concluded in order to find out the effect of honey on hay fever. But in a small study conducted in USA, people were given each substance such as pasteurized honey, unpasteurized honey or a corn syrup artificially flavoured to taste like honey but none were found to have any difference on the severity of the symptoms. Although it taste nice but any proof that it works is currently lacking.

 

 

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